Level of schooling effects on student conceptions of assessment: The impact of high-stakes assessments on secondary students’ beliefs

Gavin Thomas Lumsden BROWN, Lois Ruth HARRIS

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Student beliefs about assessment appear to vary according to the level of schooling they are enrolled in, with high school students being more negative about assessment. The Students Conceptions of Assessment version 6 (SCoA-VI) inventory elicits attitudes towards four beliefs (assessment improves teaching and learning; assessment measures external factors; assessment has affective impact/benefit; and assessment is irrelevant). Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis, SCoA-VI responses of elementary school students (n=100) and high school students (n=134) revealed statistically significant mean score differences. The older students agreed less with improvement, affect/benefit, and external factors conceptions and more with the irrelevance conception. Hence, this study provides further evidence that level of schooling has a significant effect on student conceptions of assessment.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Citation

Brown, G. T., & Harris, L. R. (2011, April). Level of schooling effects on student conceptions of assessment: The impact of high-stakes assessments on secondary students’ beliefs. Paper presented at the (American Educational Research Association) AERA 2011 Annual Meeting: Inciting the social imagination: Education research for the public good, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana.