Legitimate participation? Instructional designer-subject matter expert interactions in communities of practice

Michael James KEPPELL

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This paper addresses the question of how instructional designers work with subject matter experts (SMEs) in unfamiliar content areas. It is suggested that working as an instructional designer in an unfamiliar content area is similar to an anthropologist working in a foreign culture. Instructional designers enter communities of practice and attempt to understand the context as well as complete learning designs for specific audiences. It is suggested that unlike new professionals who work toward full participation and full acceptance in the community of practice, the instructional designer aims for legitimate participation within the sub-culture. To successfully achieve legitimate participation the instructional designer will need to utilise a number of communication strategies to optimise the interaction with the SME. Copyright © 2004 The Association for Advancement of Computing in Education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2004
EditorsLorenzo CANTONI, Catherine MCLOUGHLIN
Place of PublicationChesapeake, VA
PublisherThe Association for Advancement of Computing in Education
Pages3611-3618
ISBN (Print)9781880094532
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Citation

Keppell, M. J. (2004). Legitimate participation? Instructional designer-subject matter expert interactions in communities of practice. In L. Cantoni & C. McLoughlin (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2004 (pp. 3611-3618). Chesapeake, VA: The Association for Advancement of Computing in Education.

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Instructional design

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