Learning to make change happen in Chinese schools: Adapting a problem-based computer simulation for developing school leaders

Philip HALLINGER, Shaobing TANG, Jiafang LU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

School leader training has become a critical strategy in educational reform. However, in China, there still exists a big gap in terms of how to transfer leadership knowledge into practice. Thus, tools that can integrate formal knowledge into practice are called for urgently in school leader training. This paper presents the results of a research and development (R&D) approach to adapt an existing online computer simulation, Making Change Happenᵀᴹ, for use in Mainland China. The paper describes the process used to inform and assess our cultural adaptation of the simulation, as well as the response of Chinese principals to learning through this innovative method. Results affirmed the necessity for cultural adaptation of ‘Western’ curricula and tools for use in the Chinese context. The positive response of the Chinese school principals to learning via an online computer simulation suggested future potential for employing technology-facilitated, active learning modes in China. Implications are outlined for theory, research, and practice. Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-187
JournalSchool Leadership & Management
Volume37
Issue number1-2
Early online dateFeb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Citation

Hallinger, P., Tang, S., & Lu, J. (2017). Learning to make change happen in Chinese schools: Adapting a problem-based computer simulation for developing school leaders. School Leadership & Management, 37(1-2), 162-187.

Keywords

  • China
  • Change management
  • Leadership development
  • PBL
  • Computer simulation

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