Learning styles and perceptions of student teachers of computer-supported collaborative learning strategy using wikis

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18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of an attempt to integrate a collaborative technology, Wiki, into learning within a course in a teacher education programme based on social constructivist learning theory. The current study aimed to explore student-teacher acceptance of the proposed pedagogy and to identify specific learning style preferences that might be favourable to accepting the proposed pedagogy. A total of 56 student teachers participated in this study. They completed a number of collaborative tasks using a wiki during the learning process, and were then invited to complete a questionnaire designed to solicit their perception on the usefulness of wikis and their attitudes towards using a wiki, and 39 of them also returned a learning styles inventory which was used to identify the learning styles profile of the student-teacher samples. The findings reveal favourable perceptions of the use of a wiki as a collaborative learning tool in the course. Qualitative data collected from open-ended questions also reflects similar favourable results. Active learners were also found to be significantly different from reflective learners in accepting the wiki as a learning tool. Copyright © 2015 Australasian Journal of Educational Technology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-50
JournalAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Citation

Li, K. M. (2015). Learning styles and perceptions of student teachers of computer-supported collaborative learning strategy using wikis. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 31(1), 32-50.

Keywords

  • Computer-supported collaborative learning
  • Web 2.0 learning
  • Technology in teacher education
  • Leaning styles
  • Teacher education
  • Collaborative learning

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