Learning strategies of secondary ESL students in Hong Kong and the implications for language teaching

Hing Man Angela MOK-CHEUNG, Jacqueline Margaret WHEELER

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This research project investigated the learning strategies of junior secondary students in Hong Kong ESL classrooms. A total of 132 Form One to Form Three students from 56 schools were studied, observed and interviewed: data were collected accordingly. Students were categorized into “successful” language learners and “unsuccessful” language learners according to their English language academic achievement. Data findings from this research showed that the “successful” language learners employ meta-cognitive strategies more frequently than the “unsuccessful” ones. They tended to plan, evaluate and reflect more on their approach to language learning and ways to improve their English. The two groups did not show a significant difference in group work mode of learning, yet, the “successful” language learners preferred to work on his / her own more. The level of father’s education was found to be associated with the type of learning strategies used by students, however, gender did not seem to affect the choice of learning strategies. These findings have important implications for language teachers in helping their students develop effective language learning strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1998

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learning strategy
Hong Kong
Teaching
language
student
group work
academic achievement
learning
English language
father
research project
classroom
gender
teacher
school
education
Group

Citation

Mok, A., & Wheeler, J. (1998, December). Learning strategies of secondary ESL students in Hong Kong and the implications for language teaching. Paper presented at the International Language in Education Conference 1998: The Curriculum: Issues in Teaching and Learning, Evaluation and Assessment, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, China.