Learning from looking at sound: Using multimedia spectrograms to explore world music

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

This article details the use of multimedia spectrogram displays for visualizing and understanding music. A section on foundational considerations presents similarities and differences between Western musical scores and spectrograms, in particular the benefit in avoiding Western notation when using music from a culture where representation through the use of a score may misrepresent that culture. Four examples from the author’s own teaching and research detail applications of multimedia spectrograms. A tutorial provides guidance for generating spectrograms using the free program Audacity. The article closes with three extension projects suitable for classroom teachers to use with their students. Copyright © 2011 NAfME: National Association for Music Education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-55
JournalGeneral Music Today
Volume25
Issue number1
Early online date27 Jul 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Oct 2011

Citation

Thibeault, M. D. (2011). Learning from looking at sound: Using multimedia spectrograms to explore world music. General Music Today, 25(1), 50-55. doi: 10.1177/1048371311414050

Keywords

  • World music
  • Culture
  • Secondary general music
  • Music education
  • Technology
  • Listening
  • Spectrogram
  • Audacity

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