Learners and learning in sinic societies

Ming Fang HE, Chi Kin John LEE, Jiayi WANG, Le Van CANH, Phyllis CHEW, Kyunghee SO, Betty Christine ENG, Min-Chuan Sung

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

In this chapter we begin with historical and cultural contexts of learners and learning in six countries/regions (China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, South Korea, and Vietnam) with shared or related Sinic civilization or the Confucian Heritage Culture. We explore the con-cept of learners and learning by looking into its controversies, contradictions, and complexi-ties within particular historical and cultural contexts. We particularly focus on the impact of historical changes (e.g., feudalism, colonialism, capitalism, globalization, etc.), convergence and divergence of philosophies (e.g., Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Legalism, etc.), and educational policies on learners and learning. We discuss the current situations of learners and learning such as demographics of learners, learning subject matter, learning experience, learning styles, and learning environments. Challenges and future directions for teachers, edu-cators, parents, community workers, administrators, and policy makers are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Asian education: A cultural perspective
Editors Yong ZHAO, Jing LEI, Guofang LI, Ming Fang HE, Kaori OKANO, David GAMAGE, Hema RAMANATHAN, Nagwa MEGAHED
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Pages78-104
ISBN (Print)9780805864441, 9780805864458, 9781410618740
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Citation

He, M. F., Lee, J. C. K., Wang, J. Y., Canh, L. V., Chew, P., So, K., et al. (2011). Learners and learning in sinic societies. In Y. Zhao, J. Lei, G. Li, M. F. He, K. Okano, D. Gamage, et al. (Ed.), Handbook of Asian education: A cultural perspective (pp. 78-104). New York: Routledge.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Learners and learning in sinic societies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.