Leading international baccalaureate diploma programme schools in developing countries: A review of issues and challenges

Moosung LEE, Ewan WRIGHT, Allan David WALKER, Lynette LEUNG

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Over the preceding decade, there has been rapid growth in schools offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP). The phenomenon is global in scope, and increasingly evident in developing countries. This chapter provides a review of emerging leadership issues in the unique and often diverse contexts of IBDP schools in developing countries. More specifically, it outlines the key findings of eleven studies (eight empirical and three discussion based) across eleven developing countries related to the contextual issues and challenges of IBDP school leadership. These include “environmental” factors such as 1) political and policy context, 2) school community context, and 3) external assessments, alongside the “organization” factors of 1) program resource intensity, 2) private self-funded status, and 3) student identities. Implications of these studies for standardization and quality assurance of the IBDP as the program continues to expand across developing countries worldwide are discussed.  Copyright © 2015. Information Age Publishing.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComparative international perspectives on education and social change in developing countries and indigenous peoples developed countries
EditorsGaëtane JEAN-MARIE, Steve SIDER, Charlene DESIR
Place of PublicationCharlotte
PublisherInformation Age Publishing
Pages253-274
ISBN (Electronic)9781681232089
ISBN (Print)9781681232065, 9781681232072
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Citation

Lee, M., Wright, E., Walker, A., & Leung, L. (2015). Leading international baccalaureate diploma programme schools in developing countries: A review of issues and challenges. In G. Jean-Marie, S. Sider, C. Desir (Eds.), Comparative international perspectives on education and social change in developing countries and indigenous peoples developed countries (pp. 253-274). Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing.