Latent profiles and transitions of daily routine disruptions are associated with severity of symptoms of anxiety and depression

Li LIANG, Wai Kai HOU, Tsz Wai LI, Huinan LIU, Robin GOODWIN, Tatia Mei-Chun LEE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this prospective study, we identified different patterns of daily routine disruptions and investigated their associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms between 2020 and 2021. A population-representative sample (N = 671) was assessed at the acute phase of the pandemic (April–July 2020, T1) and again at 1-year follow-up (April–August 2021, T2). Daily routine disruptions denoted perceived disruptions to regular exercising, socializing, and leisure. We found that respondents who could sustain regular exercising, socializing, and leisure showed the lowest levels of psychiatric symptoms at T1. Respondents reporting disruptions to these routines had the highest levels of psychiatric symptoms at T2. Respondents who could sustain or enhance the regularity of these routines between T1 and T2 reported less mental health problems than those with persistent or increased disruptions. We discussed interventions and strategies to sustain socializing and leisure for promoting public mental health during large-scale disasters. Copyright © 2023 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original languageEnglish
JournalLeisure Sciences
Early online dateJul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 2023

Citation

Liang, L., Hou, W. K., Li, T. W., Liu, H., Goodwin, R., & Lee, T. M.-C. (2023). Latent profiles and transitions of daily routine disruptions are associated with severity of symptoms of anxiety and depression. Leisure Sciences. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/01490400.2023.2228311

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • COVID-19
  • Depression
  • Latent profile analysis
  • Latent transition analysis
  • Leisure routines

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