Kindergarten teachers' perceived school culture and well-being: A comparison of non-profit-making and profit-making kindergartens

Yau Ho Paul WONG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has rarely examined teachers' perceptions of school culture (perceived school culture) and well-being in Hong Kong's non-profit-making (NPM) and profit-making (PM) kindergartens. Thus, the purpose of this study was twofold: first, it examined the relationships between Hong Kong kindergarten teachers' perceived school culture and well-being. Second, it compared NPM and PM kindergartens in terms of teachers' perceived school culture, job satisfaction and mental health complaints. Kindergarten teachers were invited to complete a set of questionnaires including a School Culture Survey, Job Satisfaction Survey and General Health Questionnaire. Results showed that teachers' perceived school culture correlated positively with their job satisfaction but negatively with mental health complaints. Interestingly, teachers in NPM kindergartens had higher job satisfaction and fewer mental health complaints than those working in PM kindergartens. The implications of promoting kindergartens' school culture and teachers' well-being are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-278
JournalEarly Child Development and Care
Volume180
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Citation

Wong, Y. H. P. (2010). Kindergarten teachers' perceived school culture and well-being: A comparison of non-profit-making and profit-making kindergartens. Early Child Development and Care, 180(3), 271-278.

Keywords

  • Perceived school culture
  • Teachers' well-being
  • Kindergarten

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