Japanese anime and manga in liberal studies education: An exploratory study of ‘why and why not’ in Japan versus Hong Kong

Man Wai Carol POON, Kam Yee LAW

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Although they are not listed in the regular teaching material, the high value of anime and manga (Japanese cartoons and comics) in teaching and learning, and the enormous application of anime and manga in teaching, is clearly recognized in Japan, especially in liberal studies subjects. Education professionals in America are also paying positive roles in regard to this new teaching lately. While cartoons and comics are also one of the most popular entertainments of Hong Kong teenagers, and Japanese commodities occupy the largest share in the market, anime and manga are barely adopted by local schools in teaching and learning of liberal studies subjects. Through in-depth interviews with teachers and case studies of school practices, this paper explains the experience in Japan by the society’s tradition, culture and attitude in reading anime and manga. Demonization of some categories of this popular culture commodity in recent decades does not demolish the long-established positive regard towards anime and manga. With the effort of the government and parent organizations, adoption of anime and manga is well justified in schooling institutions, hence constructed effectively in teaching and learning of liberal studies subjects in Japan. The paper also applies the explanation of Japan’s experience to analyze the contrary situation in contemporary Hong Kong.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

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Hong Kong
Japan
Teaching
cartoon
education
commodity
learning
teaching materials
popular culture
entertainment
school
experience
parents
market
teacher
interview

Citation

Poon, M. W. C., & Law, K. Y. (2008, December). Japanese anime and manga in liberal studies education: An exploratory study of ‘why and why not’ in Japan versus Hong Kong. Paper presented at the First International Conference: Popular Culture and Education in Asia, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, China.