Is strategic competence teachable?

Yuen Kwan Wendy LAM

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Research into the teaching and learning of speaking in the ESL context is relatively neglected. There have been a few studies only that addressed the need to incorporate the development of strategic competence into the L2 oral classroom (e.g. Cohen 1998; Dornyei 1995; Konishi & Tarone 2004). This paper will report findings from a strategy interventionist study conducted in the secondary English oral classroom in Hong Kong. Based on a psycholinguistic model of speech processing, eight strategies were identified and introduced to the treatment class in the study. A data collection method comprising stimulated recall interviews and observations that aimed to investigate respectively the learning process (i.e. covert thoughts) and the learning product (i.e. overt speech) was employed. A comparison of the findings between the treatment class and the control class which was not exposed to any strategies-based instruction supports the view that not all strategies are equal and that some are more teachable than the others. Specifically, ‘Resourcing’ seems to function as a ‘bedrock strategy’ for young L2 speakers. Moreover, it might be desirable to match the cognitive/linguistic demands of strategy use with the learners’ proficiency level in order to enhance the development of strategic competence.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

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classroom
data collection method
psycholinguistics
learning
speaking
learning process
Hong Kong
instruction
linguistics
Teaching
interview

Citation

Lam, W. (2004, December). Is strategic competence teachable? Paper presented at the International Language in Education Conference 2004: The Way Forward in Language Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, China.