Is it useful, acceptable, or controllable? Hong Kong primary school teachers’ online assessment practices in changing time

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Abstract

Few studies have explored primary school teachers’ classroom-based online assessment practices and underlying reasons. To fill this research gap, this study interviewed 48 Hong Kong primary school teachers to understand their online assessment practices and influencing factors when they were obliged to use it in their daily instruction under the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings revealed that the participants tended to use online tests/exercises for formative purposes instead of summative purposes. In addition, they tried online alternative assessment tasks, such as video or audio recordings, peer assessment and projects, and gave online feedback to students but less frequently than online tests/exercises. The school examination culture and the participants’ perceived limited control over online test fairness may have restricted their summative use of online tests/exercises. Meanwhile, the participants’ perceived positive usage norms, along with their favourable attitudes towards and confidence in using online tests/exercises probably enhanced their formative use of them. In addition, the participants’ perceived neutral usage norms and limited external control of online alternative assessment tasks and feedback seemed to impede their use of them in classrooms. Copyright © 2024 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Article number33
JournalResearch and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2024

Citation

Zhan, Y., So, W. W. M., Sun, D., & Yan, Z. (2024). Is it useful, acceptable, or controllable? Hong Kong primary school teachers’ online assessment practices in changing time. Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning, 19, Article 33. https://doi.org/10.58459/rptel.2024.19033

Keywords

  • Online tests
  • Online alternative assessment
  • Online feedback
  • Theory of planned behaviour
  • Primary school teachers

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