Is it possible to teach critical thinking to Hong Kong students through philosophy for children?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Numerous studies have shown that the Philosophy for Children (P4C) programme can promote the development of critical thinking. Meanwhile, it is arguable that the emphasis of Confucianism on creating a hierarchical and harmonious society can easily lead to submission rather than opposition, producing a conformist rather than a critical mind. A question arises here as to whether Confucianism tends to denigrate criticism and thus hinder the development of critical thinking through P4C in Hong Kong. In this chapter, I first argue that Confucianism still has a profound influence on the Chinese in the modern world. I then examine the connection between Confucianism and criticism, focusing on how Confucianism is critical. Finally, I report the results of the first systematic study that assesses the effectiveness of P4C in promoting children’s critical thinking in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2020 selection and editorial matter, Chi-Ming Lam; individual chapters, the contributors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPhilosophy for children in Confucian societies: In theory and practice
EditorsChi-Ming LAM
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages22-34
ISBN (Electronic)9780429028311
ISBN (Print)9780367137274
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

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Citation

Lam, C.-M. (2019). Is it possible to teach critical thinking to Hong Kong students through philosophy for children? In C.-M. Lam (Ed.), Philosophy for children in Confucian societies: In theory and practice (pp. 22-34). London: Routledge.