Intergenerational conflict or solidarity in Hong Kong? A survey of public attitudes toward social spending

Alfred M. WU, Kee Lee CHOU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

This study aims to investigate age-related differences in social spending preference in an Asian context, drawing on a random survey of more than 1000 adults in Hong Kong in 2013. Contrary to popular belief, older adults in Hong Kong hold a negative view toward welfare spending, especially when it is directed toward the poor population. In contrast, descriptive statistics reveal that younger people tend to support increased social spending on welfare assistance for the disadvantaged. The findings in this study provide evidence that reciprocity and solidarity in intergenerational relationships are present in Hong Kong. This demonstrates the nature of shifting social values held by different generations in a dynamic and demographically pressured Asian context. Amidst rising intergenerational conflict in different contexts in Asia, this study has profound implications for policymaking. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
JournalSocial Indicators Research
Early online dateMay 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - May 2021

Citation

Wu, A. M., & Chou, K.-L. (2021). Intergenerational conflict or solidarity in Hong Kong? A survey of public attitudes toward social spending. Social Indicators Research. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s11205-021-02607-9

Keywords

  • Social policy
  • Public attitude
  • Poverty
  • Aging
  • Hong Kong
  • Asia

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