Interactive effects of hypoxia and PBDE on larval settlement of a marine benthic polychaete

Paul K. S. SHIN, Singaram GOPALAKRISHNAN, Alice K. Y. CHAN, P. Y. QIAN, Shiu Sun Rudolf WU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Marine benthic polychaete Capitella sp. I is widely known to adapt to polluted habitats; however, its response to xenobiotics under hypoxic conditions has been rarely studied. This research aimed to test the hypothesis that interactive effects of hypoxia and congener BDE-47 of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which is ubiquitous in marine sediments, may alter the settlement of Capitella sp. I. Our results revealed that under hypoxic condition, settlement success and growth in body length of Capitella larvae were significantly reduced compared to those under normoxia of similar BDE-47 concentration. While no significant changes in morphology of settled larvae were noted in both exposure conditions, the presence of BDE-47 could enhance polychaete growth. The present findings demonstrated that the interactive effects of hypoxia and environmentally realistic concentrations of BDE-47 in sediments could affect polychaete settlement, which, in turn, reduce its recruitment and subsequent population size in the marine benthic ecosystem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-432
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume85
Issue number2
Early online date14 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2014

Citation

Shin, P. K. S., Gopalakrishnan, S., Chan, A. K. Y., Qian, P. Y., & Wu, R. S. S. (2014). Interactive effects of hypoxia and PBDE on larval settlement of a marine benthic polychaete. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 85(2), 425-432. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.04.037

Keywords

  • Hypoxia
  • PBDE
  • Interactive effect
  • Polychaete
  • Capitella
  • Settlement

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