Instrument-making as music-making: An ethnographic study of shakuhachi students' learning experiences

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instrument-making is a powerful way to teach and learn music, especially world music. This case study looks at adult music learners whose engagement in music involves instrument-making and the long lasting practice of music. A case in point is Japanese and North American practitioners of Japanese bamboo flutes, especially the end-blown shakuhachi. Informants in this ethnographic study were involved in the organic process of harvesting bamboo, making instruments, and performing music on self-made instruments. Findings indicate that instrument-making contributed to the formation of attachment to the instruments, the development of place-based musical thinking, and the creation of an enriched music-learning environment. Through the examination of an existing model of sustainable musical engagement, this study proposes a world music pedagogy that begins with instrument-making. Copyright © 2013 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-201
JournalInternational Journal of Music Education
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

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music
learning
experience
student
Ethnographic Study
Music-making
Student Learning
Music
learning environment
examination
Bamboo
World music

Citation

Matsunobu, K. (2013). Instrument-making as music-making: An ethnographic study of shakuhachi students' learning experiences. International Journal of Music Education, 31(2), 190-201. doi: 10.1177/0255761413486858

Keywords

  • Instrument-making
  • Place-based/sustainable music education
  • Self-made instruments
  • Shakuhachi
  • World music pedagogy