Information and communications technologies (ICT) and education reform: Lessons form Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia

Samuel LEONG

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Driven by the forces requiring rapid innovation in competitive world markets, today's knowledge economy is enabled by ICT's capacity to search, filter, store, transmit, encapsulate, process, and manipulate information. Workers of a knowledge economy are expected to possess ICT literacy: the ability to use technology to develop 21st century content knowledge and skills. This new kind of literacy is considered a key '21st century skill', together with global awareness, civic engagement, financial, economic and business literacy, and learning skills that encompass problem solving, critical thinking, and self-directional skills (Partnership for 21st century Skills, 2005, p.15). 21st century schools are seen to play a critical role in producing a workforce that is highly educated and skilled to support a country's economy. This recognition of education as a key contributor to the economy has led school curricula in many countries to mandate ICT as a central component, with teachers being increasingly expected to infuse ICT into the teaching and learning processes. This paper examines some of the major developments and strategies related to ICT in the education reform of three countries where the author has worked professionally. Lessons will be drawn from their experiences in enhancing music education curriculum reform for a technology-infused future.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

Citation

Leong, S. (2007, July). Information and communications technologies (ICT) and education reform: Lessons form Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia. Paper presented at Australian Society for Music Education (ASME) XVI National Conference: Celebrating Musical Communities, Perth, Western Australia.

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