Industrial arts movement's history, vision, and ideal: Relevant contemporary, used but unrecognized - Part II

Stephen PETRINA, Kenneth Scott VOLK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The accepted model of industrial arts underestimates the continuity of vocational education and technology education and exaggerates differences between industrial arts and earlier forms of industrial education. The ideals of Dewey and others have been lost as technology education reproduces old structures of industrial arts that include underrepresentation of women and minorities and ignorance of class issues. (SK) Copyright © 1995 Blacksburg, Va. : Scholarly Communications Project, University Libraries, Virginia Tech.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-35
JournalJournal of Technology Studies
Volume21
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

art
history
education
Vocational Education
communications
continuity
minority

Citation

Petrina, S., & Volk, K. S. (1995). Industrial arts movement's history, vision, and ideal: Relevant contemporary, used but unrecognized - Part II. Journal of Technology Studies, 21(2), 28-35.

Keywords

  • Curriculum development
  • Educational history
  • Educational philosophy
  • Industrial arts
  • Technology education