Indoor nocturnal noise is associated with body mass index and blood pressure: A cross-sectional study

Sha LI, Yee Tak Daniel FONG, Janet Yuen Ha WONG, Bradley MCPHERSON, Esther Yuet Ying LAU, Lixi HUANG, Mary Sau Man IP

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

Background: Studies have demonstrated that noise is associated with various health problems, such as obesity and hypertension. Although the evidence of the associations of noise with obesity and hypertension is inconsistent, there seems to be a stronger association of the latter. This study aimed to investigate the associations of noise with body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure in adults living in multi-story residential buildings.
Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Hong Kong from February 2018 to September 2019. The Weinstein Noise Sensitivity Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, ENRICHD Social Support Instrument, Patient Health Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered to the participants. BMI and blood pressure were assessed. Nocturnal noise exposure and total sleep duration were measured for a week.
Results: Five hundred adults (66.4% female), with an average age of 39 years (range: 18–80), completed the study. The average levels of nocturnal noise, BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were 51.3 dBA, 22.2 kg/m², 116.0 mmHg, and 75.4 mmHg, respectively. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, nocturnal noise was associated with BMI (b = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.01 to 1.06, p = 0.045) and SBP (b = 2.90, 95% CI: 1.12 to 4.68, p = 0.001). No association was detected between nocturnal noise and DBP (b = 0.79, 95% CI: − 0.56 to 2.13, p = 0.253). Specifically, higher nocturnal noise was associated with higher BMI (b = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.07 to 1.38, p = 0.031) and SBP (b = 3.91, 95% CI: 2.51 to 5.31, p < 0.001) in females but only higher SBP (b = 3.13, 95% CI: 1.35 to 4.92, p < 0.001) in males. The association between noise and SBP remained significant (b = 2.41, 95% CI: 0.62 to 4.20, p = 0.008) after additionally adjusting for lifestyle, diagnosis of hypertension, psychometric constructs, and sleep.
Conclusions: Indoor nocturnal noise was associated with BMI and blood pressure in females but only blood pressure in males. It is important to control nocturnal noise or use soundproofing materials in buildings to reduce noise exposure. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Article number815
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume21
Early online date28 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Citation

Li, S., Fong, D. Y. T., Wong, J. Y. H., McPherson, B., Lau, E. Y. Y., Huang, L., & Ip, M. S. M. (2021). Indoor nocturnal noise is associated with body mass index and blood pressure: A cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 21. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-10845-2

Keywords

  • Indoor noise
  • Obesity
  • Body mass index
  • Blood pressure

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