Incremental beliefs of ability, achievement emotions and learning of Singapore students

Wenshu LUO, Kerry LEE, Pak Tee NG, Joanne Xiao Wei ONG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the relationships of students' incremental beliefs of math ability to their achievement emotions, classroom engagement and math achievement. A sample of 273 secondary students in Singapore were administered measures of incremental beliefs of math ability, math enjoyment, pride, boredom and anxiety, as well as math classroom attention and disruption. In addition, students' end-of-year math achievement scores were collected from school records. The hypothesised mediation model was supported in structural equation modelling analysis. Incremental beliefs of math ability were associated positively with math enjoyment and pride, and negatively with math boredom and anxiety. Achievement emotions fully mediated the relationships of incremental beliefs of math ability to classroom engagement and math achievement. Incremental beliefs of math ability were associated positively with classroom attention through math enjoyment and pride, negatively with classroom disruption through math anxiety and positively with math achievement through the two outcome-related emotions, math pride and anxiety. The findings and implications are discussed in the academic context of Singapore. Copyright ©2014 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-634
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume34
Issue number5
Early online dateApr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Luo, W., Lee, K., Ng, P. T., & Ong, J. X. W. (2014). Incremental beliefs of ability, achievement emotions and learning of Singapore students. Educational Psychology, 34(5), 619-634. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2014.909008

Keywords

  • Incremental beliefs
  • Achievement emotions
  • Classroom engagement
  • Achievement

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