Implementing citizenship education in twenty-seven societies: Does the mode of curriculum delivery enhance student learning

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Most countries in the world have citizenship education programmes, and for most governments it is a priority. Nevertheless, because of political, practical or other reasons, different countries adopt different approaches to delivering this element of the school curriculum. Yet McDonnell and Elmore (1987) have suggested that different outcomes can result from the use of different policy mechanisms. This issue has been investigated using the result of the IEA Civic Education Study that surveyed approximately 90,000 14-year-old students from 28 countries. This study wanted to find out whether the mode of curriculum delivery influences students’ learning of civic knowledge and skills. The research will inform policymakers of the advantages and drawbacks of current practice and alternative policy approaches and assist them to determine whether a change in the policy instrument, for example, whether citizenship education is mandated and compulsory, will improve student learning outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Citation

Fairbrother, G., & Kennedy, K. (2008, November). Implementing citizenship education in twenty-seven societies: Does the mode of curriculum delivery enhance student learning. Paper presented at the Asia-Pacific Educational Research Association (APERA) Conference 2008: Educational Research for Innovation & Quality in Education: Policy & Pedagogical Engagements Across Contexts, National Institute of Education, Singapore.

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