Immigrant students' emotional and cognitive engagement at school: A multilevel analysis of students in 41 countries

Ming Ming CHIU, Suetling PONG, Izumi MORI, Bonnie Wing-Yin CHOW

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Central to student learning and academic success, the school engagement of immigrant children also reflects their adaptation to a primary institution in their new country. Analysis of questionnaire responses of 276,165 fifteen-year-olds (50 % female) and their 10,789 school principals in 41 countries showed that school engagement has distinct, weakly-linked cognitive and emotional components. Native students had weaker attitudes toward school (cognitive engagement) but greater sense of belonging at school (emotional engagement) than immigrant students or students who spoke a foreign language at home. Students with better teacher–student relationships, teacher support or a classroom disciplinary climate often had a greater sense of belonging at school and had better attitudes toward school than other students. While immigrant students often have solid attitudes toward school, teachers can help them feel a greater sense of belonging at school. Copyright © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1409-1425
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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Multilevel Analysis
multi-level analysis
immigrant
Students
school
student
learning success
academic success
teacher
Population Groups
foreign language
principal
Language
Learning
climate
classroom
questionnaire

Citation

Chiu, M. M., Pong, S.-L., Mori, I., & Chow, B. W.-Y. (2012). Immigrant students’ emotional and cognitive engagement at school: A multilevel analysis of students in 41 countries. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 41(11), 1409-1425.

Keywords

  • Student engagement
  • Immigrants
  • Sense of belonging
  • Attitude toward school
  • International comparisons