Imagination in teaching and learning

Stuart RICHMOND

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Imagination, or what one poet calls her “star of free will” has been variously described as the essence of genius; as the capacity to think of things as possibly being so; as a broad flexibility of mind; as the ability to conceive of the unusual and effective; as a formative ability; as a consequence of the interplay of language itself; and, more recently as a disruption in thinking occasioned by luck due to the inadequacies of rule-following. Such conceptions are helpful in our thinking about imagination in the classroom and will be used in this paper to develop a working definition even though they do not explain in the particular case what steps to follow to achieve an imaginative outcome. Fortunately it is not necessary to have totally a transparent concept in order to facilitate students' imaginative work in a practical realm because what educators have instead are norms of practice, experience, examples, experimentation, trial and error, poetry, personal insights, and first-hand accounts (among other things). This paper will examine, critically, a number of such sources with a view to gaining a better understanding of imagination and its pedagogical implications. Copyright © 2000 The Hong Kong Institute of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching effectiveness and teacher development in the new century
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherHong Kong Institute of Education
Pages1-3
ISBN (Print)9629490382
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Teaching
Educators
Poet
Luck
Poetry
Conception
Experimentation
Disruption
Genius
Language
Free Will
Essence

Citation

Richmond, S. (2000). Imagination in teaching and learning. In Proceedings of International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching effectiveness and teacher development in the new century [CD-ROM] (pp. 1-3). Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Education.