If they can not adapt to school, then this is the school that will have to adapt to them: Discussion with an expert approach nurture

Paul William COOPER, Caroline COUTURE

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

In an ideal world, all children would come to school with the desire to learn and the skills to do it. They could take turns, follow simple instructions, cooperate with peers, respect some rules and to want to explore! Unfortunately, because of certain vulnerabilities, sometimes due to personal characteristics and sometimes due to their life experiences, some students do not have the prerequisites needed to succeed as we begin their schooling. Some of these gaps fill quite quickly, thanks to the well ensuring support of their teachers and school staff. However, others see the gap between their abilities and those of others to widen gradually as they progress. They demonstrate challenging behaviors such opposition, loss of control, refusal to work, a significant inhibition, etc. Although it wants to integrate the large majority of students in regular classes, it can be particularly difficult to meet the great needs of these students and to get them to grow within such a context. In seventy years, in Britain, a school psychologist named Marjorie Boxall, wanted to react in relation to this situation. Guided by his understanding of the developmental challenges faced by these children and the attachment theory, Dr. Boxall was then said: "If these children can not adapt to the school is the school quidevra adapt to them! "And she created the first Nurture Group. This resource class was part of the neighborhood school and could accommodate up to a dozen children "not able to adapt to school." While children maintained their link to their regular class, they spent a lot of time in their Nurture Group, where a specially structured environment allowed them to operate at their real level of development (sometimes that of a toddler), surrounded by adult anxious to secure to encourage the continuation of this development. Gradually, as the children developed the necessary skills, they increasingly reintegrated into their regular classes until they no longer need to go to the Nurture Group. This model created by Marjorie Boxall and his team from the suburbs of London has grown in recent decades and today there are hundreds of Nurture Groups in Britain. Nurture The model has also inspired some initiatives around the world, including New Zealand, you Mal-, Portugal and ... Quebec, where the kangaroo Classes are developed since 2005. The plenary conference will be an opportunity to hear one of the pioneers of Nurture Groups in England, Professor Paul Cooper, talked to Caroline Couture, who was involved in the establishment of kangaroo Classes in Quebec. They will present all the basic principles that guide the action in a Nurture approach the challenges of this approach and the successes it has generated.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Citation

Cooper, P., & Couture, C. (2012, May). If they can not adapt to school, then this is the school that will have to adapt to them: Discussion with an expert approach nurture. Paper presented at the 4th Biennial Congress CQJDC - 2012: Canadian observatory for the prevention of school violence: School violence: Promising practices to care for the young, Quebec, Canada.

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