Identifying strategies to support junior secondary students to engage in scientific investigation tasks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article describes the outcome of a collaborative project between the Hong Kong Institute of Education and four secondary schools that aims to promote the development of scientific investigation skills. The project team designed scientific investigation tasks collaboratively with the teachers and provided school-based support when the tasks were implemented. A total of six teachers and 575 students were involved. Data were collected through questionnaires completed by the students and individual interviews with science teachers about their classroom practice after the completion of the project. The findings suggest that the students did not meet many difficulties and that there were positive influences on students' interest in learning science. The teachers perceived that there were challenges related to raising students' self-regulated learning abilities, structuring tasks that were at appropriate levels of difficulty, and promoting group cooperation among the students. Finally, the article argues that the strategies implemented in this study were effective, though it takes much time and effort to help students develop self-regulated learning abilities. The conclusion suggests that teachers consider these challenges collectively and proposes a two-staged model for planning scientific investigation tasks. Copyright © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-120
JournalCanadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Citation

Cheng, M. M.-H. (2008). Identifying strategies to support junior secondary students to engage in scientific investigation tasks. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 8(2), 99-120.

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