How you think about your intelligence determines how you feel in school: The role of theories of intelligence on academic emotions

Ronnel Bornasal KING, Dennis Michael MCINERNEY, David A. WATKINS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on implicit theories of intelligence and academic emotions have proceeded in parallel with little cross-over of ideas. This study aims to examine the potential synergies that may exist between these two strands of research by examining whether implicit theories of intelligence can function as a predictor of academic emotions when situated within Pekrun's (2006) control-value theory of achievement emotions. Filipino secondary school students (N=1147) participated in the study. Hierarchical regression analyseswere employed to investigate the predictive effects of implicit theories of intelligence on academic emotions after controlling for the variance accounted for by demographic variables, social environmental factors, and achievement goalswhich have been identified as important antecedents in previous research. Results indicated that holding an entity theory of intelligence positively predicted negative emotions such as anger, anxiety, shame, hopelessness, and boredom. However, it was not significantly related to the positive emotions of enjoyment, hope, and pride. The usefulness of these findings for integrating theorizing in the implicit theories of intelligence and academic emotions literature is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)814-819
JournalLearning and Individual Differences
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Intelligence
intelligence
Emotions
emotion
school
Hope
Research
Boredom
Shame
value theory
boredom
control theory
Anger
shame
synergy
anger
environmental factors
secondary school
Anxiety
Demography

Citation

King, R. B., McInerney, D. M., & Watkins, D. A. (2012). How you think about your intelligence determines how you feel in school: The role of theories of intelligence on academic emotions. Learning and Individual Differences, 22(6), 814-819.

Keywords

  • Achievement emotions
  • Implicit theories of intelligence
  • Achievement goals