How teachers' beliefs and demographic variables impact on self-regulated learning instruction

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between teachers’ beliefs regarding self-regulated learning (SRL), together with key demographic variables, including gender, school sector and teaching experience, and their SRL instruction. A survey investigating teachers’ beliefs and instructional practices regarding SRL was administered to 873 Hong Kong teachers teaching in primary (N = 429) and secondary schools (N = 444). The instruments were examined from a Rasch measurement perspective and the results demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties of the instruments for use with the current sample. The Rasch-calibrated person measures were subsequently subject to hierarchical multiple regression analyses. The results showed that teachers’ beliefs about the benefits of SRL and student capacity in implementing SRL were positive and significant predictors of SRL instructional practices. Gender was also a significant predictor of SRL instructional practices, with female teachers demonstrating higher levels of SRL instructional practices. The implications of the findings for teaching practice and teacher education are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)564-577
JournalEducational Studies
Volume44
Issue number5
Early online dateSep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Yan, Z. (2018). How teachers' beliefs and demographic variables impact on self-regulated learning instruction. Educational Studies, 44(5), 564-577. doi: 10.1080/03055698.2017.1382331

Keywords

  • Self-regulated learning
  • Teacher belief
  • Instructional practice
  • Rasch measurement
  • Demographic variable

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