How socioeconomic status (SES) affects Chinese word reading and spelling among Chinese kindergarten children in Hong Kong

Research output: Other contributionOther contributions

Abstract

Aims: In Hong Kong, nearly 20% of children are living in poverty (Census and Statistics Department 2017). However, little is known about how different cognitive-linguistic skills mediate the relationship between SES and children’s word reading and spelling. The present study aims to examine the direct effect of SES on children’s concurrent Chinese literacy skills and how cognitive-linguistic skills mediate the longitudinal links among SES, word reading and spelling in Chinese.
Method: Participants were 109 Hong Kong Chinese children. These children were administered the measures of vocabulary knowledge (VK), phonological awareness (PA), morphological awareness (MA), executive functioning (EF), Chinese word reading (CWR), and Chinese word dictation (CWD) at both Kindergarten K2 (Time 1) and K3 (Time 2).
Results: SES at Time 1 had a direct effect on CWR at Time 1 with age and cognitive-linguistic skills controlled, and an indirect effect on CWD at Time 2 that was fully mediated by PA and VK at Time 1.
Conclusion: The results highlight that SES exerts an impact on children’s early Chinese reading and spelling skills and suggest the utility of improving phonological awareness and vocabulary knowledge of low-SES children. Copyright © 2018 ICPEAL 17 - CLDC 9.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Citation

Fung, W.-K., & Chung, K. K.-H. (2018, October). How socioeconomic status (SES) affects Chinese word reading and spelling among Chinese kindergarten children in Hong Kong. Poster presented at The 17th International Conference on the Processing of East Asian Languages and the 9th Conference on Language, Discourse, and Cognition (ICPEAL 17 – CLDC 9), National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

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