How do phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, and vocabulary contribute to early numeracy and print knowledge of Filipino children?

Xiujie YANG, Katrina May DULAY, Catherine MCBRIDE, Sum Kwing CHEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

The current study investigated the contributions of phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and vocabulary to early numeracy and print knowledge developmental trajectories. A total of 128 young Filipino children were tracked three times at mean ages of 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5 years. The initial level (the intercept) and the growth rate (the slope) of early numeracy and print knowledge were estimated. Results showed that phonological awareness, vocabulary, and age significantly predicted the initial level of early numeracy. RAN and vocabulary explained significant variance in the growth rate of early numeracy. Phonological awareness, RAN, and vocabulary accounted for unique variance in the initial level of print knowledge. Results highlight the differential roles of phonological awareness, RAN, and vocabulary knowledge in the development of early numeracy and print knowledge among Filipino children. Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Article number105179
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume209
Early online dateMay 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Citation

Yang, X., Dulay, K. M., McBride, C., & Cheung, S. K. (2021). How do phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, and vocabulary contribute to early numeracy and print knowledge of Filipino children? Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 209. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2021.105179

Keywords

  • Early numeracy
  • Print knowledge
  • Phonological awareness
  • Rapid automatized naming
  • Vocabulary knowledge
  • Children

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