How culture and tradition shape the development of educational change: A critical analysis of a child-centered curriculum in Hong Kong

Sze Yin Shirley YEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

In order to support the current round of educational reform, officials in Hong Kong have proposed that schools conduct internal and external evaluation. For this reason, the researcher accepted an invitation to be a school curriculum evaluator. The school was typical of those in the region that face challenges brought by curriculum reform (Curriculum Development Council, 2001). The researcher wished to make an external evaluation of school-based child-centred curriculum reform. The researcher took a case study approach (Stake, 1995) and found that the school had achieved some success in enforcing chanage. Yet underlying the situation was incoherence and dissatisfaction. Findings also indicated that stakeholders' conceptions, cultural factors and traditional values about teaching and learning all interacted to influence implementation of the curriculum ideal. Finally, based on insights arising from this school-based curriculum evaluation experience in Hong Kong, the researcher explores the question: "How feasible or relevant is the notion of democratic leadership in a society embracing Chinese culture?" The article aims to be instructive to all involved in efforts to reform education across cultures. Copyright © 2006 Pacific Circle Consortium for Education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-36
JournalPacific-Asian Education
Volume18
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Citation

Yeung, S. S.-Y. (2006). How culture and tradition shape the development of educational change: A critical analysis of a child-centered curriculum in Hong Kong. Pacific-Asian Education, 18(2), 16-36.

Keywords

  • Primary Education
  • Educational Policy and Management

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