Hong Kong principals' perceptions on changes in evaluation and assessment policies: They're not for learning

Ming Yan NGAN, Chi Kin John LEE, Gavin Thomas Lumsden BROWN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

Hong Kong has introduced new school evaluation and assessment policies since 1997 which need to be implemented by school leaders. This context creates the possibility that policy intentions are not understood, accepted, or implemented. Using discrepancy evaluation analysis, this study reports interviews from 23 Hong Kong school principals about their perceptions and experiences of new policies to do with school evaluation and assessment for learning. The discrepancies fell into five major categories: one size does not fit all; a matter of school survival; workload for teachers; time pressures on those who manage and teach; and learning environment at the schools. The school principals were not convinced that the intended outcomes of helping schools to improve learning were achieved, rather they believed the policies were being implemented to control and close schools unfairly. Copyright © 2010 Philippine Society for Educational Research and Evaluation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-46
JournalAsian Journal of Educational Research and Synergy
Volume2
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

Citation

Ngan, M. Y., Lee, J. C.-K., & Brown, G. T. L. (2010). Hong Kong principals' perceptions on changes in evaluation and assessment policies: They're not for learning. Asian Journal of Educational Research and Synergy, 2(1), 36-46.

Keywords

  • Evaluation and assessment policy
  • Principals
  • Discrepancy
  • Qualitative research

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