Hong Kong primary students' perceptions of schooling: A preliminary study

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Sending children to school is a big issue to thousands of parents. In order to enroll a ‘desirable’ primary school, parents spend plenty of time in getting an application form and to prepare their children to take the grade one admission test. It seems that going to school is very significant in the eye of the parents; however, what is school really meant to children? This study which aims at describing the feelings and thoughts of children about school, interviewed with 54 students in three primary schools. Results show that most children like going to school due to the variety of school lives like meting friends during recesses. Lessons like physical education, arts and craft were very attractive. They also felt that going to school is necessary. Some children believed that the aim of study and the main role of being students was to achieve good results. As educators, we need to listen to children’s voices and examine their perspectives and opinions carefully because they would provide us with a remarkable reflection of how to run an ideal school. Copyright © 2000 The Hong Kong Institute of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching effectiveness and teacher development in the new century
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherHong Kong Institute of Education
Pages1-7
ISBN (Print)9629490382
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Citation

Chan, P. P.L., & Chan-Tam, T. M. N. (2000). Hong Kong primary students' perceptions of schooling: A preliminary study. In Proceedings of International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching effectiveness and teacher development in the new century [CD-ROM] (pp. 1-7). Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Education.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hong Kong primary students' perceptions of schooling: A preliminary study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.