Higher education and graduate employment in Mainland China and Taiwan: A comparative review in the context of massification

Yat Wai LO, Xiao HAN

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

This paper examines the issues about graduate employment in the context of massification of higher education in mainland China and Taiwan. The issues mainly refer to high unemployment rate, relatively low starting wages and job mismatch. The paper draws on government documents, statistics and research findings to provide a descriptive analysis of these issues, thereby revealing the relationship between educational attainment and social mobility in the two Chinese societies. The empirical results indicate that higher education qualifications do not have significantly positive impacts on earnings and possibly bring negative effects on unemployment rate in mainland China and Taiwan. These findings shed light on the validly of human capital theory, which assumes that being educated brings higher productivity, and screening hypothesis, which focuses on the sorting function of education, in understanding the economic values of higher education in the two societies.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

Citation

Lo, W. Y. W., & Han, X. (2015, February). Higher education and graduate employment in Mainland China and Taiwan: A comparative review in the context of massification. Paper presented at the Comparative Education Society of Hong Kong (CESHK) Annual Conference 2015: Developing scholarship in comparative education, The University of Hong Kong, China.

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