Health risk assessments based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in freshwater fish cultured using food waste-based diets

Yu Bon MAN, Wing Yin MO, Feng ZHANG, Ming Hung WONG

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Abstract

Two farmed freshwater fish species Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and jade perch (Scortum barcoo) were cultured with food waste-based diets and compared with commercial formulated control diet for a period of six months. Sixteen priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the diets and cultured fish meat were tested by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. No significant differences of ∑PAHs were observed between Nile tilapia and jade perch fed with food waste-based diets and control diet (p > 0.05). However, there were significantly higher concentration of ∑PAHs in market fish compared with the same species of fish fed by food waste-based diets (p < 0.05). Thus, the food waste-based diets have a potential to lower the PAH concentrations in farmed fish when compared with market fish. Based on the PAH concentrations, a human health risk assessment was made. The results indicated there were no non-cancer and very low cancer risks of consuming fish cultured with food waste-based diets at the 95th centile (Nile tilapia: hazard index (HI adult) = 0.343 × 10⁻³, HI children = 0.614 × 10⁻³ and cancer risk value = 0.943 × 10⁻⁶; jade perch: HI adult = 0.456 × 10⁻³, HI children = 0.814 × 10⁻³ and cancer risk value = 0.291 × 10⁻⁶). In general, the fish fed with food waste-based diets were unlikely to cause adverse health effects, based on the concentrations of PAHs. There is great potential for using food waste-based diets as an alternative to commercial feeds for cultivating freshwater fish. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Article number113380
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume256
Early online dateOct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

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Citation

Man, Y. B., Mo, W. Y., Zhang, F., & Wong, M. H. (2020). Health risk assessments based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in freshwater fish cultured using food waste-based diets. Environmental Pollution, 256. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.113380

Keywords

  • Cancer risk
  • Non-cancer risk
  • Food safety
  • Jade perch
  • Nile tilapia