Growth and nutrient uptake of arbuscular mycorrhizal maize in different depths of soil overlying coal fly ash

Y.L Bi, X.L LI, P CHRISTIE, Z.Q HU, Ming Hung WONG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Application of topsoil over phytotoxic mine wastes is often practised to establish perennial plant communities on minespoil areas. In China, population pressure encourages attempts to remediate such areas by growing arable crop plants, but efforts to establish agricultural crops often fail. We report an outdoor pot experiment that compared the effects of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe and G. versiforme (Karsten) Berch, on the growth and nutrient uptake of maize (Zea mays L.) grown in different depths of soil layer overlying coal fly ash. Colonization by both AM fungi increased plant growth compared with non-mycorrhizal controls, with G. mosseae giving higher yields of maize than G. versiforme at the same depths of soil. Increasing soil depth led to increased plant yields. Mycorrhizal plants absorbed more nutrients than non-mycorrhizal controls, and translocated less Na to the shoots, perhaps protecting the plants from excessive Na accumulation. These preliminary results indicate that arbuscular mycorrhizas may make a substantial contribution to successful crop establishment in soils overlying areas of coal fly ash. Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-869
JournalChemosphere
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2003

Citation

Bi, Y. L., Li, X. L., Christie, P., Hu, Z. Q., & Wong, M. H. (2003). Growth and nutrient uptake of arbuscular mycorrhizal maize in different depths of soil overlying coal fly ash. Chemosphere, 50(6), 863-869. doi: 10.1016/S0045-6535(02)00231-X

Keywords

  • Coal fly ash
  • Mycorrhiza
  • Maize
  • Mine soil
  • Phytoremediation

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