Gratitude, relatedness needs satisfaction, and negative psychological outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: A short-term longitudinal study

Jesus Alfonso Daep DATU, Frank D. FINCHAM

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Although gratitude relates to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) well-being outcomes in the United States, more evidence is needed to understand how this psychological strength reciprocally relates to mental health during this pandemic. This study examines the association of gratitude with stress, anxiety, and depression among undergraduate students in the United States via a longitudinal design. Methods: An online survey was administered to 643 undergraduate students in a public university located in the southeastern region of the United States. There was a 1-month interval between the first and second waves of data collection. Results: Cross-lagged panel structural equation modeling showed that whereas gratitude positively predicted subsequent relatedness needs satisfaction, it negatively predicted later stress, anxiety, and depression. Relatedness needs satisfaction was reciprocally linked to subsequent gratitude. Conclusion: Results suggest that gratitude might serve as a protective psychological resource against the detrimental mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Copyright © 2022 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Early online dateMay 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - May 2022

Citation

Datu, J. A. D., & Fincham, F. D. (2022). Gratitude, relatedness needs satisfaction, and negative psychological outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: A short-term longitudinal study. Journal of Clinical Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/jclp.23364

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Gratitude
  • Mental health
  • Relatedness
  • Undergraduate students

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