Global citizenship and universal values of Hong Kong educated youth

Hei Hang Hayes TANG, Angel Oi Yee CHENG, Chung-Hin Kevin HO

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This chapter provides a review of education policies, broader discourse, and recent protests to consider the ways Hong Kong identities draw simultaneously from its post-colonial legacy, position as a global city, traditions of open economy and pursuit of democracy, and reversion to Chinese sovereignty. The chapter highlights some of the tensions these legacies and experiences have created in education and for civic identities. Drawing from the empirical data of a recent survey about democratic values, identities and political participation (N = 1,004), this research found that 63% of respondents perceived global citizenship is more important than a Chinese identity. It was discovered that young people with stronger identification as global citizens agree with the universal value of democracy to a greater extent, and respondents who identify themselves as "Hongkonger" are more likely to perceive that global citizenship is more important than a Chinese identity. According to a senior United Nations human rights official (Schattle, 2009), the original global citizens are people whose fundamental human rights can no longer be protected by their state government. They have no other citizenship than their humanity. The chapter will engage in a working argument that global citizenship can serve as an open and undefined space for the "rootless" Hong Kong young people (Ho & Tang, 2020), situated on China's periphery, to search for a meaningful civic identity. Imagining their own broad-based civic self without a national identity, global citizenship creates for Hong Kong educated youth a "mental territory" that can go beyond the authoritarian Chinese nation-state and offer them alternatives of civic affiliations more aligned with their experiences of recent democratic struggles in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2021 by Information Age Publishing.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearch on global citizenship education in Asia: Conceptions, perceptions, and practice
EditorsTheresa ALVIAR-MARTIN, Mark C. BAILDON
Place of PublicationCharlotte, NC
PublisherInformation Age Publishing, Inc
Pages61-78
ISBN (Electronic)9781648023255
ISBN (Print)9781648023231, 9781648023248
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Citation

Tang, H.-H. H., Cheng, A. O. Y., & Ho, K. C.-H. (2021). Global citizenship and universal values of Hong Kong educated youth. In T. Alviar-Martin & M. C. Baildon (Eds.), Research on global citizenship education in Asia: Conceptions, perceptions, and practice (pp. 61-78). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc.

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