Gender, school management and educational reforms: A case study of a primary school in Hong Kong

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15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Across the globe, many countries have incorporated new managerialism and marketization to reform their education systems. Feminist studies have already pointed out that these changes are gendered and masculinized and have documented their impacts on women teachers in secondary, higher and further education. Yet interestingly, while primary teaching is a feminized occupation, the ways that these changes and the associated practices are gendered and affected women teachers are relatively under-researched. This article, based on a case school in Hong Kong, attempts to fill this gap. By teasing out the gendered assumptions embedded in management strategies, it will show how an entrepreneurial school has attempted to succeed in a competitive educational market by exploiting young women, discriminating motherhood and forging competition among women of different educational qualifications. While making visible the patriarchal interests and masculine norms of the school, the article also aims to illuminate the contradictions and tensions inherent in, or generated, by those strategies. Copyright © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)491-510
JournalGender and Education
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

Citation

Chan, A. K.-W. (2004). Gender, school management and educational reforms: A case study of a primary school in Hong Kong. Gender and Education, 16(4), 491-510. doi: 10.1080/09540250042000300394

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