Gender differences in creative self-efficacy: Findings of mean and variability analyses

Jing Mavis HE WU, Wan-chi WONG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated gender differences in creative self-efficacy among 398 (49.5% female) undergraduate students in Hong Kong by analyzing both means and variability. The Creative Self-Efficacy (CSE) subscale in the Short Scale of Creative Self (SSCS) was translated and adapted to Chinese to assess creative self-efficacy. Interesting gendered patterns were found. First, the results of mean comparisons suggest a pattern of male superiority, though the effect size was small (d = 0.24). Second, the results of variability analyses suggest a pattern of greater male variability: (1) men exhibited greater variance than women in the overall distribution of creative self-efficacy scores, with the male/female variance ratio (VR) = 1.64, and (2) men were overrepresented at both the high and low extremes of the score distribution, with the male/female ratio = 2.62 – 9.99. The important methodological implication is that both means and variability should be analyzed to gain a more thorough understanding of gender differences in creative self-efficacy. The practical implication of the findings is that gender differences should be considered in the cultivation of creative self-efficacy, which has been shown to positively influence creative outcomes and creative achievements. Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100955
JournalThinking Skills and Creativity
Volume42
Early online dateSep 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Citation

He, W. J., & Wong, W.-C. (2021). Gender differences in creative self-efficacy: Findings of mean and variability analyses. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 42. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsc.2021.100955

Keywords

  • Creative self-efficacy
  • Gender
  • Greater male variability
  • Mean analysis
  • Variability analysis

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