From ‘civilising the young’ to a ‘dead-end job’: Gender, teaching, and the politics of colonial rule in Hong Kong (1841–1970)

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The feminisation of teaching is an important topic in education and gender studies. Discussions have been enriched by comparative and international studies as well as a gendering perspective in which a complicated view of the role of the state has emerged. In colonial Hong Kong, although the government was limited in its support of teacher training, its strategic control was not ineffective. Through regulating the teaching force, the colonial regime was instrumental in training women to help civilise the young and in creating a dead end job – that of a ‘primary school teacher’. It also constantly (re)constructed the nature and role of ‘Chinese teacher’ and ‘Chinese women’. By revealing some seldomexplored strategies and disrupting the fixed meanings of ‘Chinese teacher’, ‘Chinese women’, and ‘primary school teacher’, this paper unravels the intervention and (re)invention of the colonial regime in the teaching occupation and probes their implications for a patriarchal society. Copyright © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-514
JournalHistory of Education
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

Citation

Chan, A. K.-w. (2012). From ‘civilising the young’ to a ‘dead-end job’: Gender, teaching, and the politics of colonial rule in Hong Kong (1841–1970). History of Education, 41(4), 495-514.

Keywords

  • Feminization
  • Gendering
  • Chinese women
  • Primary school teacher
  • Colonial rule

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