Friends and critics of the state: The case of Hong Kong

Tai Lok LUI, Hsin Chi KUAN, Kin Man CHAN, Sunny Cheuk Wah CHAN

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hong Kong has never been short of civic organizations.1 Right from the early years of its colonization by the British in the nineteenth century, local Chinese gathered in temples and discussed how to protect and promote their interests in a sociopolitical environment of foreign rule. Kaifong (neighborhood, or neighbor) and tungheung (native place) formed the social and cultural basis of the formation of collective identity and of the mobilization for collective action. Furthermore, though Hong Kong’s population has always been in flux, with migrants arriving at different critical phases of its social development, for more than 160-odd years its residents have had the will and ability to form voluntary bodies and self-help groups to deal with the social, economic, and political issues they encounter in their everyday lives. Copyright © 2005 editorial matter and selection, Robert P. Weller; individual chapters, the contributors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCivil life, globalization and political change in Asia: Organizing between family and state
EditorsRobert P. WELLER
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group
Pages58-75
ISBN (Electronic)0203330897, 9781134291106, 9780203330890
ISBN (Print)9780415343015, 0415343011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

self-help group
collective identity
colonization
collective behavior
social development
social economics
everyday life
mobilization
critic
Hong Kong
nineteenth century
migrant
resident
ability

Citation

Lui, T.-L., Kuan, H.-C., Chan, K.-M., & Chan, S. C.-W. (2005). Friends and critics of the state: The case of Hong Kong. In R. P. Weller (ed.), Civil life, globalization and political change in Asia: Organizing between family and state (pp. 58-75). Abingdon: Routledge.