'Fitting in' or 'being different'? Integration, separation, and identity construction during a teaching practicum in Hong Kong

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that examined the perspectives of one group of teacher educators and pre-service teachers about a teaching internship in Hong Kong. Reflecting recent interest in both a practice turn in pre-service teacher education as well as teacher identity construction, the study uses in-depth interviews to reveal how both teacher educators and pre-service teachers construct the meaning of a teaching internship. The results suggest that two discourses dominate such meanings: the discourse of integration and the discourse of separation. The study not only reveals the presence of these discourses but, moreover, considers how their interplay provides affordances for and constraints upon the capacity of pre-service teachers to construct their professional identities during the teaching internship. This exploration suggests that this interplay can lead to identity conflict for pre-service teachers. Implications for overcoming such conflict in ways that support the construction of pre-service teachers' professional identities are considered and suggestions for future comparative research discussed. Copyright © 2018 Teacher Development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-586
JournalTeacher Development
Volume22
Issue number4
Early online dateMay 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Trent, J. (2018). 'Fitting in' or 'being different'? Integration, separation, and identity construction during a teaching practicum in Hong Kong. Teacher Development, 22(4), 571-586. doi: 10.1080/13664530.2018.1466722

Keywords

  • Teacher identity
  • Teaching practicum
  • Discourse analysis
  • Teacher education

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