Features of an integrated primary curriculum

Man Tak CHAN

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

In Hong Kong, the General Studies (GS) has been a core primary curriculum, which integrates three former separate subjects, Primary Science, Social Studies and Health Education, since 1994. The rationale of such an integrated curriculum is to help pupil understand the inter-relationship between people, things and their environment so that they can acquire knowledge and skills and develop positive attitudes in a holistic way. Proponents of curriculum integration claim that a good integrated subject is able to achieve more aims than those from separate subjects. An integrated curriculum should provide wider and better learning outcomes than that from learning through separate subjects. Within the context of an integrated curriculum for primary students in Hong Kong, this study aimed at identifying the intended curriculum features of the GS Curriculum. The study also intended to probe the extent of the curriculum features implemented in classrooms. A total of 189 teachers participated in a questionnaire survey. By using the method of Confirmatory Factor Analysis, this study identified four major curriculum features in this integrated curriculum, namely, “holistic learning”, “relevancy to learners’ life”, “development of problem–solving skills” and the “Society-Technology-Society (STS) approach”. Results of this study also revealed that teachers perceived the existence of these four intended features in the GS Curriculum and the gaps between the curriculum intention and the real-classroom situation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2005

Citation

Chan, M.-T. (2005, May). Features of an integrated primary curriculum. Paper presented at Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference: Research, Policy, Practice, Singapore.

Keywords

  • Primary Education
  • Theory and Practice of Teaching and Learning

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