Family acculturation, parent style, and ethnic minority students' identity construction in Hong Kong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This chapter reports on a qualitative study on the interaction between family socialization and parent style of three immigrant South Asian families and how such interaction influences the identity construction of second-generation adolescents in Hong Kong. Taken together, the three families in this study represent the diversified acculturation experiences of the transnational families, with relatively low socioeconomic status, in the host society. The families in this study are found to travel between past, present, and future and are faced with intricate contradiction between ideology and practice. The findings that different transnational families may diversify in their experiences, family language policies, parenting styles, and intergenerational interaction patterns and/or conflicts have implications for policymakers when social policies and professional practices regarding immigrant/transnational families are made. Copyright © 2018 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHome-school relations: International perspectives
EditorsYan GUO
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherSpringer
Pages155-174
ISBN (Electronic)9789811303241
ISBN (Print)9789811303227
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Gu, M. M. (2018). Family acculturation, parent style, and ethnic minority students' identity construction in Hong Kong. In Y. Guo (Ed.), Home-school relations: International perspectives (pp. 155-174). Singapore: Springer.

Keywords

  • Family acculturation
  • Parent style
  • Identity construction
  • Second-generation adolescents
  • Low socioeconomic status

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