Factors affecting the state anxiety level of higher education students in Macau: The impact of trait anxiety and self-esteem

Hoi Yan CHEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study is to find out the levels of anxiety of 589 day- and night-class students in higher education in Macau two weeks before the final examination period. The Chinese version of the 40-item Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, Gorsuch & Lusherier, 1970) was applied in this study. The two anxiety scales are nicely constructed into several logical and explainable factors. In addition, the Chinese version of Rosenberg's self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) was applied to find out the relationship between students' self-esteem and their trait and state anxieties. Generally speaking, night-class students, who had full-time jobs during the day, had significantly higher levels of anxiety than day class students, who were either unemployed or engaged in part-time employment. Furthermore, based on the results of the path analysis, students' general anxiety levels might be affected by their general state of anxiety and their self-esteem. It is hoped that through this study, the educational context of higher education might be better understood. Copyright © 2006 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)709-725
JournalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

Citation

Cheung, H. Y. (2006). Factors affecting the state anxiety level of higher education students in Macau: The impact of trait anxiety and self-esteem. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 31(6), 709-725.

Keywords

  • Education
  • Anxiety
  • Education, Higher
  • Students
  • Self-esteem
  • Path analysis (Statistics)
  • Part-time students
  • Research

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