Exploring the roles of writing and reading self-efficacy in the well-being of graduate students

Emily JONAS, So Yeon LEE, Hui WANG, Nathan C. HALL

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

Research on graduate education is increasingly focused on students’ writing and reading experiences throughout their programs (McAlpine & Amundsen, 2012), as well as their motivation and well-being (Gardner, 2009; Hyun et al., 2006). However, limited research examines graduate students’ motivational experiences specific to writing and reading, especially in relationship to well-being outcomes. The present study used an online survey to explore writing and reading self-efficacy (i.e., a motivational construct) and several measures of well-being in graduate students (N = 851). Hierarchical linear regressions revealed writing self-efficacy to be a strong predictor of well-being. An interaction effect was also observed between writing and reading self-efficacy on imposter syndrome, suggesting the importance of both writing and reading support programs in well-being promotion. Copyright © 2019 All Academic, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Citation

Jonas, E., Lee, S. Y., Wang, H., & Hall, N. C. (2019, April). Exploring the roles of writing and reading self-efficacy in the well-being of graduate students. Paper presented at The American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (AERA 2019): Roundtable session of Well-being in graduate school: Challenges and support, Toronto, Canada.

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