Exploring the problems of learning science in the English medium: A study on high school students’ perceptions and attitudes in China

Chaoqun LU, Wing Mui Winnie SO, Yeung Chung LEE, Yau Yuen YEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

English is being used as a medium of instruction (EMI) for delivering science lessons in China. This study investigated Chinese high school international programme students’ perceptions of and attitudes towards EMI, particularly about their perceived difficulties and support in learning. A questionnaire with Likert-type items, student group interviews, and individual teacher interviews were used in the study. Quantitative data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and descriptive analysis, while qualitative data were analysed by means of thematic analysis. The findings indicated a mismatch between the difficulties students encountered and the support teachers provided and revealed the problem of passive strategies for teaching science in English. Findings also suggested strategies for supporting students to learn science in the English medium, especially in inquiry-based science classrooms. These findings have important implications for integrating science and English learning. Copyright © 2021 National Institute of Education, Singapore.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Education
Early online dateNov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Nov 2021

Citation

Lu, C., So, W. W. M., Lee, Y. C., & Yeung, Y. Y. (2021). Exploring the problems of learning science in the English medium: A study on high school students’ perceptions and attitudes in China. Asia Pacific Journal of Education. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/02188791.2021.2005539

Keywords

  • English medium instruction
  • Learning science in the English medium
  • Perceptions
  • Difficulties

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