Exploring the intentions and practices of principals regarding inclusive education: An application of the theory of planned behaviour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed at providing explanation and prediction of principals’ inclusive education intentions and practices under the framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). A sample of 209 principals from Hong Kong schools was surveyed using five scales that were developed to assess the five components of TPB: attitude, subjective norm, perceived behaviour control, intention, and behaviour. Rasch analysis was utilised to examine the psychometric quality of the scales and generate principals’ measures, which were subsequently subjected to path analysis to investigate the relationships among the five components. The results revealed a good model–data fit. Principals’ attitude and perceived subjective norm were strong and significant predictors of their intention to implement inclusive education. The predictive power of perceived behaviour control on intention was not significant. Intention and perceived behaviour control were found to have significant predictive power for principals’ reported inclusive practice. The implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014 University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-221
JournalCambridge Journal of Education
Volume45
Issue number2
Early online dateAug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Citation

Yan, Z., Sin, K.-f. (2015). Exploring the intentions and practices of principals regarding inclusive education: An application of the theory of planned behaviour. Cambridge Journal of Education, 45(2), 205-221.

Keywords

  • Inclusive education
  • Rasch measurement
  • Theory of planned behaviour
  • Principal
  • Path analysis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring the intentions and practices of principals regarding inclusive education: An application of the theory of planned behaviour'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.