Exploring factors related to young children’s word-meaning derivations during read-alouds

Tanya CHRIST, X. Christine WANG, Ming Ming CHIU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores how child and text clues were related to 31 kindergarteners’ word-meaning derivation outcomes for 372 words presented in books read aloud to children. Data were analyzed using a multilevel, cross-classification, ordered logit model. Children showed no word-meaning derivation 40% of the time, indicating a need for instruction. Better word-meaning outcomes were related to text factors (written text clues in close proximity to the word) and child factors (literal comprehension and metacognition). Thus, using text with written clues in close proximity to the word and building children's literal comprehension and metacognition may improve word-meaning derivation. Copyright © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-38
JournalReading Psychology
Volume38
Issue number1
Early online dateJun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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comprehension
Logistic Models
instruction
Group
Metacognition
time

Citation

Christ, T., Wang, X. C., & Chiu, M. M. (2017). Exploring factors related to young children’s word-meaning derivations during read-alouds. Reading Psychology, 38(1), 1-38. doi: 10.1080/02702711.2016.1193584